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Events

Webinars

Cell Signaling Technology​
Nov 23, 2018 1:30 p.m. GMT+8
APAC webinar in 2018Q4--570x300px_201801
Discovery Through Validation: ChIP Assays

Research in the field of epigenetics has grown at a rapid pace since the discovery of the first histone acetyltransferase enzymes 18 years ago.  Since then, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the basic mechanisms of epigenetics (histone acetylation, histone methylation, chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation) and the impact of epigenetic deregulation on cancer, inflammation, metabolism, and neurological diseases.  This impact on disease has been underscored by the recent identification of potential oncogenic mutations and losses of epigenetic regulators such as the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and chromatin remodeling protein ARID1A.


The chromatin IP (ChIP) assay is a widely used application and has provided a wealth of information regarding the localization and abundance of epigenetic marks and DNA-binding proteins across the genome in many cell types and tissues.  In this webinar, we will present on important factors to consider when performing the ChIP assay, including use of highly validated antibodies, optimized protocols and reagents, and the advantages of using enzyme-based chromatin digestion over sonication-based chromatin fragmentation.

Intracellular Flow Cytometry in Action

Traditionally, flow cytometry has been used to identify distinct cell types within a heterogeneous pool of cells, based on extracellular or surface marker expression, an application commonly known as immuno-phenotyping. However, this technology is also readily amenable to intracellular target detection and can be successfully applied to the study of complex signaling events.


Thus, when combined with the detection of cell surface markers intracellular flow cytometry becomes a powerful platform, which enables characterization of signaling networks at a single cell level within phenotypically distinct cell populations.